Landyachtz Dinghy

You may have heard of a little cruiser called the Landyachtz Dinghy. With almost a million views on YouTube, it certainly has a following. So, what's all the fuss about?

What is a Landyachtz Dinghy?

The Dinghy is a small (28.5" x 8") cruiser skateboard produced by Landyachtz Longboards. What started in the early 2000s has developed over the years into a finely tuned city machine - a versatile board that cruises comfortably, handles a variety of terrain and has good trick potential too.

Are all Landyachtz Dinghy the same?

Not quite! Landyachtz have expanded the Dinghy range to include not only a range of graphic options but also different shapes, sizes and widths. Options available at the classic Dinghy trackwidth are:

Dinghy
Dinghy Fender: raised wheel arches
Dinghy Coffin: shorter, fatter, more angular
Dinghy Shape 9: wider board, wider tail, flatter nose
Dinghy Turbo: fibreglass reinforced, even bigger wheels

The Dinghy Blunt is a wider (8.6") version running on wider trucks.

Last but not least, the Tugboat is the big brother of the Dinghy at 30" x 9.24" for those looking for more space for their feet, comfort and stability.

More info on the differences between these and other similar boards can be found in our detailed Cruiser Comparison guide.

Is the Landyachtz Dinghy good for beginners?

One thing all beginners are looking for in a cruiser is stability, which can be found by lowering the platform, lengthening the wheelbase, widening the trackwidth, or simply skating all the time! The Dinghy's narrow trucks and short length mean it's not a stable board.

For those who skate street or are already comfortable on a cruiser, there's no doubt that this is one of the best out there. For those stepping on board for the first time, something longer, lower or wider would be more forgiving to learn with.

Can you ollie on a Landyachtz Dinghy?

Most definitely! In fact, if there's a trick you can do on a regular skateboard, you can probably do it on a Dinghy.

The tail is super functional and the geometry works perfectly with the bigger wheels to ensure maximum pop. The Dinghy has a stubby nose - shorter than a popsicle nose - that keeps the board's length down and the functionality up.

Which is the best Landyachtz Dinghy?

Our honest answer: it's the one that makes you want to go skate! Whether that's due to the awesome graphics, the funky outline, the width of the trucks or the size of the wheels. You know best what you need from it - whether that's a little more stability (go for a Tugboat) or doing mad flip tricks (classic all the way), Landyachtz have tried to create a Dinghy for everyone's taste.

Are there any alternatives to a Landyachtz Dinghy?

The Dinghy is far from the only cruiser skateboard available and the price tag can be offputting, especially to beginners. Luckily, there are a plethora of mini cruisers available from a host of respected brands! Some great alternatives are:

Lush Longboards Fuel
Lush Longboards Nomad
Loaded Coyote
Arbor Pilsner
Arbor Pocket Rocket
D-Street Atlas
Landyachtz ATV

Our favourites can be found in our Cruiser Skateboards Beginner's Guide.

Should I get a Dinghy or a Tugboat?

The quick answer for most people is: Tugboat. The longer and wider platform is more suited to adult feet, giving a lot of extra confidence, especially for beginners. At 155mm, the trucks are also around 50% wider than those on the Dinghy and will be a lot more stable initially, and also as you grow to tackle some descents too. For most adults looking to simply enjoy cruising and carving, we recommend the Tugboat over the Dinghy.

Having said that, the Dinghy is a fantastic option for those with small feet and for kids. For street skaters too, it will feel closer to what you know and is more responsive to flip tricks than the wider Tugboat. It's nippy, light and agile and can easily be strapped to a backpack or thrown under a desk.

What trucks and wheels come on a Landyachtz Dinghy?

The Landyachtz Dinghy comes as standard with 105mm Polar Bear trucks, 63mm Fatty Hawgs wheels in 78a, and Bear Spaceballs built-in bearings.

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